THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Aug06

Spirit: Dan Pearson

Why Should You Buy Spirit: Garden Inspiration By Dan Pearson?

Because it is by Dan Pearson, who designs beautiful gardens and also writes so eloquently about plants…

“I like the idea of planting for longevity and find myself increasingly drawn to the idea of planting for the future. A tree will map decades if not centuries in its branches…”

We cannot help but fall for the turn of phrase ‘map decades if not centuries in its branches’… and feel an excitement bubble inside us at the thought of joining him in planting for the future too…

The photos are wonderful, but it is more than just a picture book. Dan Pearson has married words to what he shows in order to share with us a new way of thinking about our landscape. Now, a book that asks us to develop a new way of thinking about our landscape is not your usual gardening book, and so we must respect its attempts to improve our gardening.

Japan

In one section of ‘Spirit: Garden Inspiration’ Dan Pearson takes us to Japan

“The gardens were a surprise for they are far more removed from the ‘natural world’ than I had ever imagined they could be. The compositions are a stylised vision of the landscape in which the elements have been meticulously edited and juxtaposed… my own work has shifted as a result, through the removal of the extraneous and the realisation that less can reveal more.”

But it is the pages on the Hokkaido Forest House we come back to in the book again and again – the words and photos have an unsettling effect on us – which illustrates exactly why this book improves our gardening, because to be unsettled is not a bad thing at all, it forces us to expand the way we think!

“Our host had been ‘gardening’ his forest… by repeatedly cutting the bamboo, forcing it to weaken and retreat, our host revealed in its wake a forest floor, which miraculously regenerated, from a seed bank left in the soil. Over the years this quiet man had been tending his twenty acres for diversity by steering the ecology… there was no digging, no conventional gardening practise happening here. By reading the balance between the plants in the forest and through a process of editing, he had heightened the natural ecology to a point that could only be described as breathtaking. This was a light touch with a broad vision, a vision that was about being part of the environment rather than dominating it.”

What is there not to like about that section? What if the gardening media encouraged this soft, low-impact approach, instead of earning their money by hard landscaping front gardens?

JP’s Cabin

One of our favourite sections of the book is JP’s Cabin – a friend of Dan Pearson’s who had acquired 5 acres of land in Connecticut. Previously the home of a naturalist, the landscape around the building had been managed to provide a habitat for birds and other wildlife.

“An old Polaroid from the mid-eighties showed the clearing around the cabin as not much more than a meadow, but over time, and to provide touch-down places for the birds, he had allowed it to be colonised by shrubs. Wild cornus and various natives selected for their droops and berries had formed islands in the meadow… The meadows and the seedling trees and shrubs amongst them have to be edited, so they are selectively cleared in the winter to break the natural succession.

This is my ideal property: a humble building with an outlying barn, which is set in an environment that invites nature right up to the front door. There is no garden to speak of, save the pumpkin patch where Native American corn and essentials are grown for the kitchen, but the land is as rich an experience as you could ever wish for.”

A garden designer who can fall in love with a place that has ‘no garden to speak of’ is a garden designer to follow – removing the design from the realm of ‘art’ and giving it a wider purpose – to create a better world for people to live in. (The irony is, of course, that gesture immediately makes the work feel ‘artful’…)

Lotusland

This is a video from another of the gardens in the book – Lotusland, created by opera singer Madame Ganna Walska.

“The gardens… make no concession to gardening with nature, for Walska was interested in a larger-than-life aesthetic that was operatic in its way and certainly not lacking in drama.”

This is one of the most interesting threads about the book – it is not just a paean to gardens ‘Dan Pearson loves’, or a style of gardening that he is comfortable making… but it is a capturing of what he has seen – whether he agrees with it or not, it is all noted down to be thought about and learnt from.

This is probably gardening’s biggest strength – nature will always go its own way, so it is your job to just observe it, which in turn forces you to be less judgemental and to look for the best in what is on offer. It offers an emotional education, not just a physical one.

Dan Pearson is a true plantsman – just take a look at his must-have perennials. But he is also a writer you will take a lot from – so do pick up his book Spirit: Garden Inspiration now – and open yourself up to a different way of gardening. (You can buy it now by clicking on the picture below!)

Apr27

Beekeepers – Quick Notes On Plants For Bees

tulips for bees

Fine news for beekeepers today – a total ban on bee-harming pesticides has been announced! To celebrate, here is a list of plants we recommend as being brilliant for the bees: Helenium Sedum Echium vulgare Marjoram or Oregano Eupatorium (common name? Joe Pye-Weed. But don’t let that put you off!) Borage Nepeta Veronicastrum Teucrium Bonus plants for shady spots? Try hellebore, lamium and pulmonaria. Looking for a shrub to plant near your apiary? Phillyrea ought to do it. Although it is difficult to get hold of…. we are working on making it more available though, so check back with Modern …

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Apr20

Thoughts On Modern Mint, April 2018

Hey Modern Minters, we have been busy already this year – so busy! Here is some of the topiary work we love doing so much…. A post shared by ModernMint (@modernmintshop) on Apr 5, 2018 at 9:48am PDT Whilst evenings (and some afternoons!) have been spent travelling the country giving garden talks to clubs, horticultural societies, WI’s and U3A’s. This is all fabulous fun but it has meant: We have not been consistent with our mailing list I have not finished the book ‘Helping The Honeybee’ I was due to get to the publisher by the end of February There …

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Mar30

Helping The Honeybee, Southend On Sea Beekeepers

Helping the honeybee

This week I gave a talk – Helping The Honeybee – to the lovely beekeeping group at Southend on Sea. Here are some notes for those who didn’t have a chance to write down some of the ideas we spoke about and shared…. The Top Plants For Bees Helenium Sedum Echium Marjoram (which you will find in your seedballs) Oregano Eupatorium, also known as Joe Pye-Weed Borage Nepeta Veronicaastrum Teucrium Phillyrea If you want a hedge for around your apiary, you will not go too far wrong with planting the amazing, tough as old boots, Phillyrea. Read plenty more about …

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