THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Apr16

Gilding the Lily – Amy Stewart (Part Four)

This is the fourth part in our series about the fabulous book Amy Stewart wrote on the cut flower industry, ‘Gilding the Lily’.

You can read previous blogs here:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

It is a fascinating book that tries to describe what life is like for cut flower growers (and sellers) around the world. Do you buy this ‘luxury’ item from a country where people depend on growing flowers for an income, or does it not really help them in the long run? These are tough decisions to make, as any action you take affects a long chain of people.

We personally had a ball when we grew cut flowers for florists, and quickly discovered the amazing quality flowers from your own garden have. They last longer, they smell better, they aren’t grown with chemicals and the choice is far far better – because you decide what to grow, and each month something new will thrust its way forward to be seen. You will also start looking everywhere for that elusive cut flower – hedges become a place to discover treasures you have never thought of using, banks of earth grow flowering diamonds you can’t wait to take home, and climbers that have grown too large, too vigorously, become new material for your next vase.

Even vases become a tough choice as you hone your floristry eye…

Vase 'Vivien'

It also challenges the mind – you look at the flower you want to cut, and you have to work out how best to treat it to make it last as long as possible. Your technical ability gets stretched. It is great for you to grow cut flowers.

But here is what Amy Stewart has to say about the cut flower industry, especially growers from abroad… this quote is from an organic flower farm…

Amy Stewart on working conditions for organic flower growers…

“In the production room I had to ask why the workers wore so little protective gear – just a rubber apron and gloves…

‘When you use less chemicals, you don’t need all the protection.’

That’s when I realised that what I couldn’t see made all the difference. What they weren’t doing was every bit as important as what they were doing…”

In one company in Ecuador the women who harvested the flower would write their name on a label – this bouquet is handmade by… – it is a way to add soul to a product, but also remind people of the work that went into these flowers, that their is a craft and a provenance to what you buy.

We hope you will look through our other blog posts about Amy Stewart, as well as looking at her book Gilding the Lily.

But more than anything, we hope you will try and grow you own flowers at home – it really is a wonderful way to get out into the garden.

(Try our cut flower kit below, to make sure you have everything you need!)

Cut Flower Kit

Jun28

Make Your Own Microbes

We are fans of effective microbes, and use the in our topiary work. They help keep plants healthy, meaning the plants have more tools in their toolbox and energy in their lives to stave off any diseases. Here is a lovely article that tells you how to make your own microbes. Right at the end. Make Your Own Microbes

Jun15

Boxwood – Dealing With Blight & The Caterpillar

Boxwood is one of our absolute favourite plants. The evergreen leaf that shines in winter, the smell as you clip it, the brilliant shapes you can make from it… but it is suffering somewhat from two major problems: Box Blight Boxwood Caterpillar and Moth None of this is the be all and end all for boxwood, but it helps to be aware of it and know a little about what you can do should either of these problems arise. Boxwood Caterpillar & Moth I hadn’t seen this in a garden I worked on until this spring, when a client I …

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Jun06

Orchard Design At Brogdale, National Fruit Collection In Kent

Last weekend I visited the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, to take part in an orchard design course they were running. Beautiful place and a warm day, I recommend a visit. I came home with 3 bottles of cider. Drank them all. Then realised they were weighing in at 8%. I don’t recover that quickly (no longer being 20 years old) and so had something of a musty head the next morning. The power of apples I say! Below are some notes I made from the day. They may be of use to you, although really they are there for …

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