THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Jul10

Verbena Bonariensis

Verbena Bonariensis

We know we know – Verbena bonariensis is so well known, planted in so many gardens, that it has become uncool to use it these days. Its ubiquitiousness means it gets judged in harsher tones than other plants, as if its popularity has made it offensive.

This is not the Verbena’s fault. It became popular for a reason – it weaves its way around the garden but doesn’t out compete other plants, it provides height and structure, encourages wildlife, is a gorgeous purple, looks good with other plants and fits into schemes as diverse as a country meadow to urban minimalism. Who wouldn’t want a plant like that? (Possibly the people of Buenos Aires, where this Verbena was discovered and given its name ‘bonariensis’… we’ve not noticed it around the city recently. Time for a trip and take a better look? See if the Argentines are enjoying one of their own…?)

At Modern Mint we refuse to let this lack of love for the plant deter us – a heinous crime against the arbitrarial zeitgeist of good taste it currently may be, but it is a plant with wonderful qualities (for an example of how it is currently viewed, note that it didn’t make it into Dan Pearson’s list.)

The wheels will keep turning and it will come back into fashion, hopefully this time considered the great garden plant it is.

Where and how do you use it?

Plant it in full sun or part shade.

Don’t cut it down before winter, let it stand (and seed.)

It looks great alongside shrub roses, or Miscanthus…

It prefers a damper soil. Really, it does. Henk Gerritsen told us, and observations we made from our own experiments lead us to agree…

“I sometimes made deadful miscalculations. For example, I assumed that due to their lanky growth Verbena bonariensis  and Verbena hastata loved aridity, but in practise I noticed that they wilted away in dry places. Only later did I read that in the wild both species grow in moist places, in South and North America respectively.”

That concludes our ode to Verbena bonariensis. We hope you dismiss the current vogue of not using Verbena, and enjoy it as the brilliant garden plant it is.

(And click on the link below to take you to the wonderful Henk Gerritsen book we quoted from above…)

Jul21

Wild Farming at Village Farm

Wild Farming

Awhile back the internet and its web of click throughs led us to discover a relatively new farm right on the tip of the South Devon coast. We read a little about it, bookmarked the website to revisit, then promptly forgot it. Then this interview with the farmer, Rebecca Hosking, appeared on the BBC – Wild Farming. A brilliant 20 minutes of radio where Rebecca explains why they farm the way they do and what they hope to achieve, namely turning a neglected piece of land that would fail to inspire if farmed conventionally into a wildlife rich, productive habitat …

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Jul11

Best Gardening Hat

gardening hat

The photo above has a truly international flavour – an Italian wearing a Brazilian gardening hat! Our very own Stefano posed for this shot last week in Chelmsford, Essex, surrounded by the beautiful flower heads of Stipa gigantea (a plant that has an exotic travelling history itself, being found growing wild in Southern Spain and into Morocco…) He was wearing a new product we have here at Modern Mint – the eco-friendly gardening hat! This is a product we discovered about 12 months ago when one of our lovely clients told us about it. He said it was durable, strong, …

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Jul09

How To Deal With Squirrels In Your Garden

This is a guest post from Naomi Webb – – Naomi Webb is a freelance writer specialising in lifestyle content who has written for a wide range of publications, focusing on providing home and garden tips/advice for a variety of audiences. Squirrels may look adorable as they scurry up and down trees, jumping from branch to branch in search of nuts. But, you won’t think they are so cute when they start destroying all your hard work in the garden. Once you have seen them digging up your bulbs, raiding the bird table and damaging your plants, these bushy tailed …

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