THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Jul10

Verbena Bonariensis

Verbena Bonariensis

We know we know – Verbena bonariensis is so well known, planted in so many gardens, that it has become uncool to use it these days. Its ubiquitiousness means it gets judged in harsher tones than other plants, as if its popularity has made it offensive.

This is not the Verbena’s fault. It became popular for a reason – it weaves its way around the garden but doesn’t out compete other plants, it provides height and structure, encourages wildlife, is a gorgeous purple, looks good with other plants and fits into schemes as diverse as a country meadow to urban minimalism. Who wouldn’t want a plant like that? (Possibly the people of Buenos Aires, where this Verbena was discovered and given its name ‘bonariensis’… we’ve not noticed it around the city recently. Time for a trip and take a better look? See if the Argentines are enjoying one of their own…?)

At Modern Mint we refuse to let this lack of love for the plant deter us – a heinous crime against the arbitrarial zeitgeist of good taste it currently may be, but it is a plant with wonderful qualities (for an example of how it is currently viewed, note that it didn’t make it into Dan Pearson’s list.)

The wheels will keep turning and it will come back into fashion, hopefully this time considered the great garden plant it is.

Where and how do you use it?

Plant it in full sun or part shade.

Don’t cut it down before winter, let it stand (and seed.)

It looks great alongside shrub roses, or Miscanthus…

It prefers a damper soil. Really, it does. Henk Gerritsen told us, and observations we made from our own experiments lead us to agree…

“I sometimes made deadful miscalculations. For example, I assumed that due to their lanky growth Verbena bonariensis  and Verbena hastata loved aridity, but in practise I noticed that they wilted away in dry places. Only later did I read that in the wild both species grow in moist places, in South and North America respectively.”

That concludes our ode to Verbena bonariensis. We hope you dismiss the current vogue of not using Verbena, and enjoy it as the brilliant garden plant it is.

(And click on the link below to take you to the wonderful Henk Gerritsen book we quoted from above…)

May21

Flowers From The Farm – In The Media!

After many years of hard work, the wonderful group ‘Flowers From The Farm’ have been spoken about quite a lot this week in the media. We were a ‘seedling’ on Flowers From The Farm when they first began their quest to bring fresh, seasonal flowers to more people. They have since grown and adapted and, importantly, supported so many people who want to grow flowers. We think they do a marvellous job and are so pleased to have seen them in the Financial Times, then the Guardian. Great reads so do go and check them out, then visit the FFTF …

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May21

Helping The Honeybee

How can you help the honeybee? Here are a few notes for you, on how you can help the honeybee and other pollinators – because if one plant is full of nectar, you might find butterflies and other bugs want to visit too! Also, The Great British Bee Count has started. If you want to take part, visit here and help map our bees. With everyone helping to collate this information on the amount and type of bees, we will all be better informed on what we need to do to reverse the decline in our ‘buzzing’ population. Helping The Honeybee At …

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May18

Wendell Berry On The Importance Of Our Soils

A fantastic programme on the BBC with Wendell Berry. Listen now to this excellent programme: Wendell Berry, The Natural World He discusses the importance of our soils, reads an incredibly depressing poem, asks that we create good work by taking responsibility for doing a ‘specific something’, and explains how, “we are living in an economy that doesn’t value nature whatsoever….” Which ties us in nicely with this report on the BBC today, about the worst offending products on the market for being non-recyclable. The ridiculous notion suggested in the report that we can place a projector in our fridges, to …

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