THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Mar18

Ken Thompson, Botanist

We are big fans of the botanist and author Ken Thompson, who was a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Sheffield.

His books are accessible, fun and full of information. Which makes for pretty good reading. What they do best though, is introduce you to ideas that you will be inspired by and interested in discovering more about. So we share some examples of his words with you, from the books No Nettles Required: The Reassuring Truth About Wildlife Gardening and Do We Need Pandas?: The Uncomfortable Truth About Biodiversity.

“The best single thing you can do for wildlife in your garden is to find a young tree and leave it alone. Failing that, plant one.”

“Long grass is good for wildlife, and in short supply in gardens. If you want to leave some long grass, while at the same time convincing the neighbours that you are not some kind of dope-smoking layabout, by all means introduce wildflowers into the grass and call it a wildflower meadow. Most wildlife, however, will take no notice of the flowers – it’s interested in the undisturbed long grass…”

“Maintaining soil carbon is easy: make as much compost as you can, grow lots of plants and go easy on the digging… in the UK, plants conatin only just over 1 per cent of our total national store of organic carbon – the rest is in the soil.”

“…grow as many different flowering plants as you can, and make sure you cover the whole year, from Mahonia for the queen bumblebee that needs a snack on a warm day in February, to ivy for the butterflies that need one last fill up before the winter.”

“As we become wealthier and eat more meat and processed foods, and acquire more consumer goods, vast quantities of water are needed for their production… every small bag of imported salad from the supermarket exports another 50 litres of drought to the Kenyans who grew it…”

“…the new, fertile landscape created by intensive farming delivers cheap food (for animals and people) in unprecedented quantities… unfortunately that’s all it delivers. The challenge is to devise multifunctional landscapes that also deliver better water quality, less soil erosion, more carbon storage and healthier and happier livestock, and are also less dependent on cheap oil…”

“In evolutionary terms, the Cape’s plants are astonishingly young, which perhaps explains how many of them manage to be so rare – there are only a few hundred individuals of many Proteaceae. Are these future successes at the start of their careers, or failed evolutionary experiments on their way to extinction?”

“Birdlife International reckons that with £19 million over the next five years, they could save from extinction all the world’s 189 critically endangered bird species… I’ve seen such sums described by conservationists as ‘vast’, but it’s hard to see why. For some reason it’s seen as naive to point out that tiny fractions of military budgets could pay for this without anyone really noticing.”

He also writes for the Telegraph, articles like this one on using crocks for drainage in pots… it is a classic example of how he makes you question and think about traditional gardening advice.

On Thursday his new book Where Do Camels Belong?: The story and science of invasive species is out on Amazon. Discounted at the time of writing!

Apr11

Testimonials From Garden Talks This Week

I have visited two new clubs this week to present a garden talk. They were in different parts of the country and so a lot of driving, but worth every hour sat on the motorway in traffic! The talks went well and I have had some lovely feedback… “Thank you so much for providing a presentation which was an almost impossible mix of enthusiasm, joy, entertainment, education and inspiration. They say that laughter is the best medicine and there was certainly plenty of that, and everyone left with a smile on their face, but just as important is that it …

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Mar28

Secateurs Marie Kondo Would Approve Of….

secateurs

Secateurs & Marie Kondo I was interviewed recently for an article in the Telegraph about the best secateurs for the garden. I let my mouth run away with me (as normal) and said that the Okatsune pruners with the red and white handles, that I use everyday in the garden, are the kind you don’t throw away when you Marie Kondo your possessions. I mean that, because I do believe in buy once buy well. But when it gets reported in the paper, I don’t half sound like a wally…! “Lerigo devoutly describes his chosen make of Japanese secateurs, Okatsune, …

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Mar27

The Best Secateurs For Your Garden – The Daily Telegraph

Modern Mint and myself have been helping the Daily Telegraph discover the best secateurs on the market. And lo and behold, our Okatsune secateurs came out top! At last, recognition for a great value pair of secateurs that I use everyday! You can see what they thought of the other items on the post here – Daily Telegraph Best Secateurs. Or buy yourself a pair from Modern Mint.