THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Jun18

Gardens of Inspiration

Gardens of Inspiration explores the influences of 15 of the best garden writers, including Christopher Lloyd, Mirabel Osler and Dan Pearson.

Photos are by Vivian Russell, who wrote Monet’s Garden: Through the Seasons at Giverny: Behind the Scenes and Through the Seasons

Each essay certainly gives an insight into the personality of its writer, as they open up about how they treat the landscape and why they are motivated to work in this way. Beth Chatto writes beautifully about Cedric Morris, and how, “… one winter evening… I was stunned to hear Cedric say I would never make a good garden where we were living. My heart sank to my boots… then we realised we already possessed on the farm at Elmstead Market, right under our feet, the very place to make a garden where we could interpret much of what Andrew’s years of studying plants in the wild had taught us. It was an area of wasteland lying on the back end of the farm; just overgrown wasteland, but I loved it.”

Nigel Colborn’s essay is called ‘Breaking the Rules’ and conveys his wonderful attitude, “I look back on a life that has been marred – or made, it depends on your point of view – with a compulsion to question everything… the temptation to follow the herd and to abandon analytical thought becomes hard to resist. But resist it one must, if one is to assess true value.” This attitude, ability even, to look and think and then make your own decisions, is important in any walk of life. It comes through strongly any time you read his words…

“I cannot see the point of fiddling about with Edwardian pergolas and clipped box when the wild world, as we know it, is almost done for. But at the same time, I cannot contemplate a departure from horticulture into anarchy. Abandoning the garden could turn out to be a greater disservice to wildlife anyway…”

A fascinating essay and worth the book alone.

The last essay we want to share with you is by Mirabel Osler, who talks about being ‘haunted’ by a garden in California.

To haunt… possibly the essence, the most enduring element, of all the great creative acts (or atrocities?) To create something that stays with its audience, impressed upon their values and emotions long after the experience has finished.

“So what makes her garden so special? My first answer would be that here is a gardener who, owning a spectacular site, has used such an unaccented touch everything she has planted appears to have evolved… Only a gardener of sensitivity could have avoided overstating the obvious.”

She goes on to paint the garden so vividly, we couldn’t turn the light off and go to bed until we had finished the chapter. This is exciting gardening… “Nowhere is there a single flowerbed – not in the English sense at least. Instead cistus, valerian, euphorbia, sage and santolina thrive… Pritchard Hill is not a place of exotica; it’s a superb landscape enhanced by form, colour and without a lawn in sight… whereas we think a lawn is essential for young children, Molly’s six – all grown up now – had trees to climb, had thickets to nest in, innumerable seats and hidden trysting corners…”

It is rare to be so excited by a book that is gets you questioning your ideas of what a garden is – but these essays do that, they inspire… we also notice the three essays we have chosen to quote from all feature some element of misrule – Beth Chatto loving a wasteland and working with what she had, Nigel Colborn not bothered with fiddling about, Mirabel Osler falling in love with a lighter touch, a garden that does not show the ‘hand of man…’

It says a lot about our style of garden-making – low impact on the environment, yet visually, making something with high drama.

You can buy Gardens of Inspiration at Amazon…

… where you can also get these (recommended) books from the writers quoted above…

Apr27

Beekeepers – Quick Notes On Plants For Bees

tulips for bees

Fine news for beekeepers today – a total ban on bee-harming pesticides has been announced! To celebrate, here is a list of plants we recommend as being brilliant for the bees: Helenium Sedum Echium vulgare Marjoram or Oregano Eupatorium (common name? Joe Pye-Weed. But don’t let that put you off!) Borage Nepeta Veronicastrum Teucrium Bonus plants for shady spots? Try hellebore, lamium and pulmonaria. Looking for a shrub to plant near your apiary? Phillyrea ought to do it. Although it is difficult to get hold of…. we are working on making it more available though, so check back with Modern …

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Apr20

Thoughts On Modern Mint, April 2018

Hey Modern Minters, we have been busy already this year – so busy! Here is some of the topiary work we love doing so much…. A post shared by ModernMint (@modernmintshop) on Apr 5, 2018 at 9:48am PDT Whilst evenings (and some afternoons!) have been spent travelling the country giving garden talks to clubs, horticultural societies, WI’s and U3A’s. This is all fabulous fun but it has meant: We have not been consistent with our mailing list I have not finished the book ‘Helping The Honeybee’ I was due to get to the publisher by the end of February There …

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Mar30

Helping The Honeybee, Southend On Sea Beekeepers

Helping the honeybee

This week I gave a talk – Helping The Honeybee – to the lovely beekeeping group at Southend on Sea. Here are some notes for those who didn’t have a chance to write down some of the ideas we spoke about and shared…. The Top Plants For Bees Helenium Sedum Echium Marjoram (which you will find in your seedballs) Oregano Eupatorium, also known as Joe Pye-Weed Borage Nepeta Veronicaastrum Teucrium Phillyrea If you want a hedge for around your apiary, you will not go too far wrong with planting the amazing, tough as old boots, Phillyrea. Read plenty more about …

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