THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Aug07

Native Trees

Native trees, if you need help deciding what you might like to plant…

1) Native Trees, Evergreen

– Box (Buxus Semperivens)

Dense wood, good in dry conditions, used for topiary.

– Holly (Ilex Aquifolium)

Dark green foliage, beautiful bark and trunk. Prize tree in winter. Male to female mix for berries.

– Yew (Taxus Baccata)

Topiary, trim once in August, thick hedge, grows faster than you think.

– Juniper (Juniperus Communis)

Dry and eat the berries, smell good or bad depending on your taste, slow growing.

– Scots Pine (Pinus Sylvestris)

Conical, red bark, needle leaves.

2) Native Trees, Deciduous

– Hawthorn (Crataegeus Monogyna)

Blossom in May, can eat the haws in Autumn (if eaten with the leaves, it is known as ‘bread and cheese…’)

– Hornbeam (Carpinus Betulus)

Trunk twists with age, great on clay soils, fresh green leaf.

– Elm (Ulmus Glabra)

Not often seen due to disease.

– Alder (Alnus Glutinosa)

Good near water, catkins in spring.

– Whitebeam (Sorbus Aria)

Fruits in autumn, leaves furry and silver below – which you notice when they are blowing in the wind.

– Service Tree (Sorbus Torminalis)

Rich red Autumn colours, smaller tree, fruits were used for brewing beer.

– Poplar (Populus Alba)

White underside of leaf, quick grower.

– Lime (Tilia Cordata, Tilia Platyphyllos)

Scented flowers in July, small, hard fruit.

– Buckthorn (Rhamnus Frangula, Rhamnus Cathartica)

Wet sites, red fruits in autumn, R. Cathartica is a smaller tree.

– Crab Apple (Malus Sylvestris)

Flowers in spring, fruits for jam in autumn, tough trees.

– Hazel (Corylus Avellana)

Fast growing, catkins and nuts.

– Oak (Quercus Rober, Quercus Petrea)

Good for wildlife, long-lived, acorns.

– Maple (Acer campestre)

Fast growing, good autumn colour.

– Birch (Betula Pubescens, Betula Pendula)

Silver and reddish bark, catkins, roots near the surface of the soil.

– Aspen (Populus Tremula)

Fluttering leaves, moist conditions, good autumn colour.

– Spindle (Euonymus Europaeus)

Great in Autumn for fruit and leaf, slightly ugly habit.

– Rowan (Sorbus Aucuparia)

Orange leaf in autumn, great berries!

– Dogwood (Cornus Sanguinea)

Dark red twigs in winter!

– Elder (Sambucus Nigra)

Fast growing, flowers for cordial or champagne, then berries later in the year.

– Ash (Fraxinus Excelsior)

Light airy canopy good for growing bulbs below.

– Cherry (Prunus Padus, Prunus Avium)

Blossom, liable to get diseased – we would rather grow cherry trees for their fruit.

– Blackthorn (Prunus Spinosa)

Massive thorns! Great berries for sloe gin.

Willow (Salix Caprea, Salix Alba, Salix Fragilis, Salix Triandra, Salix Pentandra)

Moist soils, pollard in spring, shiny foliage.

– Strawberry Tree (Arbutus Unedo)

Red, peeling bark, found in Ireland, deep red fruits.

We hope this list of native trees helps. Although ‘native’ is open to debate… Where Do Camels Belong?: The story and science of invasive species

May15

Garden Talks Via Zoom

I do lots of garden talks to clubs and societies all over the UK. You can see my subjects and how to book here – How to Book A Garden Talk. But obviously life has changed hugely, with Covid-19 and the fact we are all in isolation. This has not stopped a few intrepid garden clubs from asking me if we can still meet and discuss gardening – this time via Zoom. To Zoom Or Not to Zoom? I have weighed up doing talks via video link before. In the ‘for’ category, it would reduce my carbon footprint. I do …

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Apr16

The Impact Of Not Clipping

not clipping

The Impact Of Not Clipping Your Topiary Or Hedges This question has been on my mind recently, as we appear to be heading into a fourth week of lockdown due to Covid-19 (how extraordinary I hope this blog post reads, in a few months time, as we look back and remember what sad and strange happenings these were… at least I hope that this will read strange, as soon as possible, as if almost like a bad dream…) It is early spring and so there is no need right now to be clipping hedges. Leave them for the common UK birds …

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Apr15

Capture Carbon In Your Front Garden

residential front garden

I was asked recently whether I could give advice on how to use a small front garden to capture carbon. A great question and certainly one worth answering. So if you are keen to reduce your environmental impact, and have a little front garden space that you can transform, read on below for a few bits of advice – I hope it helps you make a beautiful front garden that improves the landscape, the air quality, the planet and the joy in the lives of everyone who walks past it! Carbon Capture In The Front Garden Using your front garden as a carbon sink …

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