THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Mar27

Phillyrea – A Shrub We Should Grow More Of!

Phillyrea is a shrub we came across a fair few years ago, in our search for clippable topiary shrubs.

It seems to have been out of favour a long time – this piece about the plant by Mary Keen is from 2004, encouraging gardeners to try it out. But those 13 years pale in comparison to the last time it was popular – in the 17th and 18th centuries!

This Blog About Phillyrea Teaches You…

  1. Why it might be unpopular now
  2. Shows photos of it as beautiful topiary, as well as a mature plant
  3. Suggests the tool you need to prune it
  4. Takes advice from Architectural Plants on how to grow it
  5. Considers its role as a valuable plant for bees

Why Is Phillyrea Unpopular Now?

This is a tough one to answer, especially when you see how lovely the plant is…

phillyrea

It is a member of the olive family

phillyrea topiary

Looks amazing clipped into topiary!

Cloud Pruning!

The fact it isn’t used more may have something to do with cost and availability. Most places who say they stock it will not have any available, while prices seem to vary greatly – a pre-clipped, cloud-pruned shrub will cost a lot more as you are paying for the topiarists time making it into that shape, while a normal 2 litre pot will be in the £8-10 range.

We heard from a nurseryman it is incredibly difficult to propagate, which is backed up by the Mary Keen piece on this lovely shrub.

We do not agree with her on one thing she says though…

“It seems a pity to clip the larger leafed form (latifolia) – if you must, tackle it with secateurs as you would laurel, so that the leaves are never sliced in half; this makes evergreens look dreadful. P. angustifolia can be clipped in the same way as box or holm oak.”

Nope! Shears will do just fine on this tree! Especially good shears….

phillyrea-latifolia- mature

Like a large head of broccoli.

How To Grow Phillyrea

Here is what Architectural Plants (where you are most likely to get a pre-cloud pruned plant) have to say about it:

“Tough as old boots. It’ll grow in sun or shade and on any soil but to get the best out of these trees they need space and light. You could say, the more exposed, the better.

It clips beautifully.

It’s only peccadillo is a terrible weakness for white fly. They’re inconvenient but there’s little you can do so ignore them.

We often sell these when restoring Tudor, Elizabethan or Mediaeval gardens. There’s masses of evidence to show that Phillyrea was used extensively hundreds of years ago. The diarist John Evelyn writes of them frequently – as if they were then as common as box, yew and holly.

What happened? They used to be so widespread and now they’re rare.

Garden historians are perplexed and so are we.”

Fantastic piece from a lovely nursery.

Phillyrea – Good For Bees?

Apparently, yes.

John Worlidge (who smartly advocated we make cider, not wine here in the UK, because that suited our climate better) wrote in 1676:

“above any tree, the bees most affect the phillyrea; one sort of them beareth in those months (spring) an abundance of greenish blossoms, which yield great plenty of of gummy rosinny sweat, which the bees daily transport to their hives…. nothing can be more acceptable to your bees than a hedge of this tree about your apiary.”

If you can get Phillyrea cheap enough as a hedging plant, would this be worth a go?

We think so!

Finishing Up On Phillyrea…

This really is a useful plant – easy to grow, easy to keep in shape if you have a small garden, allows you to have fun with pruning tools when you give it the topiary treatment, reflects light from its leaves to brighten up the garden and can be a boon for bees.

We have planted it for one client, but will be making sure Phillyrea is down on the list of any plant schedule in the future!

Apr27

Beekeepers – Quick Notes On Plants For Bees

tulips for bees

Fine news for beekeepers today – a total ban on bee-harming pesticides has been announced! To celebrate, here is a list of plants we recommend as being brilliant for the bees: Helenium Sedum Echium vulgare Marjoram or Oregano Eupatorium (common name? Joe Pye-Weed. But don’t let that put you off!) Borage Nepeta Veronicastrum Teucrium Bonus plants for shady spots? Try hellebore, lamium and pulmonaria. Looking for a shrub to plant near your apiary? Phillyrea ought to do it. Although it is difficult to get hold of…. we are working on making it more available though, so check back with Modern …

READ MORE

Apr20

Thoughts On Modern Mint, April 2018

Hey Modern Minters, we have been busy already this year – so busy! Here is some of the topiary work we love doing so much…. A post shared by ModernMint (@modernmintshop) on Apr 5, 2018 at 9:48am PDT Whilst evenings (and some afternoons!) have been spent travelling the country giving garden talks to clubs, horticultural societies, WI’s and U3A’s. This is all fabulous fun but it has meant: We have not been consistent with our mailing list I have not finished the book ‘Helping The Honeybee’ I was due to get to the publisher by the end of February There …

READ MORE

Mar30

Helping The Honeybee, Southend On Sea Beekeepers

Helping the honeybee

This week I gave a talk – Helping The Honeybee – to the lovely beekeeping group at Southend on Sea. Here are some notes for those who didn’t have a chance to write down some of the ideas we spoke about and shared…. The Top Plants For Bees Helenium Sedum Echium Marjoram (which you will find in your seedballs) Oregano Eupatorium, also known as Joe Pye-Weed Borage Nepeta Veronicaastrum Teucrium Phillyrea If you want a hedge for around your apiary, you will not go too far wrong with planting the amazing, tough as old boots, Phillyrea. Read plenty more about …

READ MORE