THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Apr25

Who Has Inspired Our Chelsea Fringe 2017 Project?

Capture Carbon In Your Garden

For the fourth year in a row Modern Mint will be taking part in the Chelsea Fringe festival. The Chelsea Fringe is THE alternative garden festival that runs alongside the Chelsea Flower Show, bringing a more whimsical and anarchic energy to gardens and garden lovers all over the world.

It has truly become a remarkable event.

At Modern Mint we have names this years project ‘Capture Carbon In Your Garden.’

Capture Carbon in your Garden

 

What Is Our 2017 Chelsea Fringe Project About?

In a nutshell, we are sharing with you the ways you can make a difference to the world and lower your carbon footprint – by using the plants and soils in your garden to capture CO2 and store it for the long-term.

This is not just a wishy washy project that you do for a little bit and then forget about. By making your garden into a carbon sink, you also improve growing conditions for the plants in your garden.

Our soils are improved by humification, the adding of organic matter. The better our soils the better the plants that grow in them. Now, humus is made up of 60% carbon, so that is one amazing way to improve the vigour and health of everything you plant.

It is best practise, and just makes sense, to capture carbon in your garden.

For more on how to do it, read Capture Carbon In Your Garden.

Who Inspired Our Chelsea Fringe Project 2017?

Why have decided to make the capture of carbon our project aim for 2017? Well, we are inspired in our gardening practise by a number of people, all brilliant minds who are following fine values.

Check them out:

Monica Araya, Building A Society Without Fossil Fuels

John Walker, the Earth Friendly Gardener

Village Farm, Fighting Climate Change on the Farm

Tshering Tobgay, from Carbon Negative Bhutan

Ecological Gardening, a brilliant blog about Carbon Capture

Carbon Gold, a company making a difference

The Third Plate, fabulous book on food and health from chef Dan Barber


These people have really made us think about how, with a few simple actions taken, our gardens can change the local landscape as well as the wider world.

Ignoring the fact that the same week we announced our carbon capture project, Donald Trump said he would use more coal to power the USA while the UK announced with great excitement that it had found 1 billion barrels of the stuff, untapped, 60 miles from the coast of Shetland…. we decided we still needed to carry on with sharing this idea to reduce our CO2 footprint.

Taking such joy in finding oil these days seems so backward. Yes, it will make investors a lot of money, but it makes Britain look silly next tot the people of Bhutan and Costa Rica, who are ploughing ahead with clean energy from renewable sources.

So what can we do? Just our best, with what we have got – our gardens, and their ability to capture carbon.

Good luck with your capture carbon project and let us know how it goes!

Mar19

Wasting Water

Well worth a read in the BBC today – a note on how wasting water in the UK “as socially unacceptable as blowing smoke in the face of a baby.” Read the report here. I have written a talk about how we use water in the  garden. It was written when I moved from Hampshire to Essex and found out for myself just how dry this area of the UK is. It completely changed the way I garden. The lack of such a precious resource as water made me question what we can do to save it, store it and …

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Mar14

The Foie Gras That Tastes Like Nature

Ethical Foie Gras? Is That A Real Thing?   Foie gras – can it be ‘grown’ ethically? The video showing how this farmer works suggests it can… We first read about this in a book called The Third Plate by Dan Barber. I loved it and I love how Eduardo the farmer, who farms on the Dehesa in Spain, has a ‘take half leave half rule’. When talking about how the geese eat his olives… “They’re always quite fair. If you make sure the geese are relaxed and happy, you’ll be rewarded with the gift of fatty livers. That is God’s …

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Mar04

Hardy Orchids Via James Wong

Hardy orchids – here is a subject I would love to know more about – so lo and behold, James Wong has written about it in the Guardian! Read the article about hardy orchids here. I love having orchids in the house, just your usual run of the mill buy them in any shop orchids, but it is a pleasure to read about the plants that will grow outside and cope with this weather. (This insane weather! From the hottest days of February on record to Storm Freya, all within a week. Weather is always such a factor in gardening, but …

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