THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Jan19

The Gardener as Playwright

We want to quote today from a book by playwright Steve Waters – The Secret Life Of Plays – as we think it ties in beautifully with a way of thinking about gardening and garden design.

“A play is a space to house a human story and must have give and, well, ‘play’ in it.”

We love this. The quote has important words in, like ‘space ‘and ‘house’ and ‘story’… ‘human’ and ‘give’… the word ‘play’ is so significant it is repeated, and the second time given its own quotation marks!

But replace the word ‘play’ with ‘garden’ (after all, it is ‘gardening’ that we are interested in here) and you get this…

“A garden is a space to house a human story and must have give and, well, ‘garden’ in it.”

When you look at your garden and think about what to do with it – remember that the most important part is not how it looks, but how the people who are going to use it can define themselves against it. Will their human story be one of rest and relaxation, or fun with friends, or a place to play football and cricket? Will they wish to welcome wildlife? Or will the garden be a chemical war-zone designed to fulfill a powerful ambition as dictator of the land, master of all that tries to reside there?

Looking at your garden as a human story that you get to tell – whoever and however many the audience are – moves you from gardener to playwright (‘wright’ means builder, or crafter.)

We would like to think that to look at your garden as a crafter of human stories would mean a release from any worry about whether you are gardening well, or right, or wrong… or any other judgement whatsoever… and give you the space and sense of ‘play’ that enables you to enjoy your garden, to look with kind eyes on your efforts, and best of all use your land to ‘give’ to those around you.

We leave you with this, another quote from the same book by Steve Waters… and wish you all the best as you ‘play’…

“The best work… is where there is a struggle between the elegance of the structure and the raw feeling of what it contains.”

May15

Garden Talks Via Zoom

I do lots of garden talks to clubs and societies all over the UK. You can see my subjects and how to book here – How to Book A Garden Talk. But obviously life has changed hugely, with Covid-19 and the fact we are all in isolation. This has not stopped a few intrepid garden clubs from asking me if we can still meet and discuss gardening – this time via Zoom. To Zoom Or Not to Zoom? I have weighed up doing talks via video link before. In the ‘for’ category, it would reduce my carbon footprint. I do …

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Apr16

The Impact Of Not Clipping

not clipping

The Impact Of Not Clipping Your Topiary Or Hedges This question has been on my mind recently, as we appear to be heading into a fourth week of lockdown due to Covid-19 (how extraordinary I hope this blog post reads, in a few months time, as we look back and remember what sad and strange happenings these were… at least I hope that this will read strange, as soon as possible, as if almost like a bad dream…) It is early spring and so there is no need right now to be clipping hedges. Leave them for the common UK birds …

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Apr15

Capture Carbon In Your Front Garden

residential front garden

I was asked recently whether I could give advice on how to use a small front garden to capture carbon. A great question and certainly one worth answering. So if you are keen to reduce your environmental impact, and have a little front garden space that you can transform, read on below for a few bits of advice – I hope it helps you make a beautiful front garden that improves the landscape, the air quality, the planet and the joy in the lives of everyone who walks past it! Carbon Capture In The Front Garden Using your front garden as a carbon sink …

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