THE MODERN MINT BLOG

May05

International Compost Awareness Week

“Compost-making doesn’t need to be hard work, costs almost nothing, and the only secret ingredient you need is patience.”

Ken Thompson, botanist and author of Compost.

Compost

Run by Garden Organic, International Compost Awareness Week aims to help people who don’t compost learn how to do it.

Join a compost group for International Compost Awareness Week.

For a really quick guide on how to compost, here it is:

Take something that can rot. Put it into a pile outside with other materials that have the ability to rot. Leave it there (as Ken Thompson said in the quote above, ‘patience is the secret ingredient!) Eventually, if you leave it long enough, you will have compost.

Not so hard to do, is it?

Why is it fantastic to make compost?

It is great for your garden. Compost is made from the plant material that you take away from the garden in the form of prunings, grass clippings, flowers and leaves.

By recycling them on a compost heap you are turning them from material you don’t want into something that a plant can make use of. It will give plants valuable nutrients to help them grow, help retain moisture and warmth in the ground and will reduce weed growth by covering bare soil, so stopping weeds germinating.

That is why compost is known as ‘black gold’ because it is so precious in the garden. The best gardener will tell you she never has enough!

Three actions you can take to reduce your impact on the world are the following:

  1. Compost
  2. Grow vegetables (for which you will need compost!)
  3. Plant a tree

Notice what is top of the list?

Seed sowing compost

We hope you will support International Compost Awareness Week. If you have more questions about compost and how to do it, there are some fantastic resources out there. Do check out the following links…

More On How To Make Compost

Garden Organic – What Can I Compost?

Modern Mint – Compost = Place Together

Green Action Centre – Why Should I Compost?

Garden Organic – Composting Myths (highly recommended!)

Ken Thompson – Compost

Modern Mint – Seed Sowing Compost

International Compost Awareness week runs until this weekend. If you have further questions on how to compost, please contact Modern Mint and we will be happy to help.

Apr28

Phillyrea From 1682

Worlidge Phillyrea

Phillyrea is one of my favourite plants for topiary. I have been using it for quite a few years as a specimen shrub, mostly due to the fact it clips well and has a tough habit – all good characteristics for a topiary plant. It also has a  reputation for being an excellent nectar source for bees… Read more about Phillyrea here. Mentioning this to Malcolm Thicke, a market garden historian and writer, he sent me a some photos of topiary and phillyrea mentioned by John Worlidge in Systema Horticulturae from 1682…. incredible! He also mentioned to me that in …

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Apr27

Kites And Strings Podcast – Topiary In The Garden

kites and strings podcast

Kites and Strings is a podcast about creativity, hosted by US-based Stephen Ploum and Catherine Chinnock. Back in March they asked me to come onto their podcast and talk about topiary, my past writing plays, the stand-up I did and how creativity can fit into your life. The Kites and Strings podcast was great fun and Stephen and Catherine are fantastic hosts. Listening back today I am surprised by some of the ideas I talked about (somehow I even started to describe a future where I run a ‘School of Creativity’ by the sea…. where did that come from?!) but it …

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Apr27

Robinia – Pruning A Beautiful Tree For Small Gardens

topiary Robinia

Robinia is often forgotten – by me, actually! – when thinking of plants for topiary. But when I work on it I do love it, brittle and soft as the wood is if you climb into it. But that danger of snapping a branch with a heavy step and falling out of the tree aside, I love it for the dappled light it allows into the garden space. Robinia Near The Sea Below is a Robinia I have gently clipped over the last few years, down near Leigh-on-Sea in Essex. The tree was large when I arrived, although it is …

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