THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Aug11

Gardening for Bats

Gardening with bats in mind is something we knew very little about, so we took a course run by RHS Hyde Hall in Essex to begin to understand better what we can do to help the bat population of the UK survive and thrive.

We spoke about what bats needed for their habitat, what food they eat, and then got to watch the bats leaving their roosts – some leaving from their prepared bat box at Wildlife Trust Essex’s Hanningfield Reservoir and some leaving from the eaves of the roof of the Wildlife Trusts visitor centre.

We had detectors that could change the pitch of the bats sound to make it audible to the human ear, so standing there hearing this noise they make rise and fall as they swooped down from the roof past your face and towards the woods was a magical and odd moment – the sound as they got close could be felt in your chest, not just as something that entered your ear… wonderful!

The people from Hyde Hall and the Wildlife Trust were incredibly knowledgeable and EXTREMELY passionate about the work they were doing – do please support their work, they really are genuine and deserve all the help they can get.

A few notes then, for the soon-to-be bat lovers amongst you:

A single bat can eat around 3000 mosquitoes or midges per night.

If you want to see a bat, hang around water at dusk, as they will find this a great feeding ground because of all the insects.

You may find bats in your roof as they like to live in stone or brickwork. They need a south facing spot to house themselves as this will keep them warm.

Bat boxes you put in trees should have easy access to the entrance for them to get in and out – the hole doesn’t have to be big, what we are saying is keep tree trunks clear of the way so that as they drop down when they come out it is easier for them. The boxes should be about 4 metres from the ground and, as ever, south facing.

Encourage bats to your garden by planting lots of insect friendly plants – where there is plentiful food there will be more reason for bats to stay and breed. If you use plants that release their scent in the evening (like petunia, nicotiana or evening primrose… the last one is easy to remember, as it is in the name, right?) then you can encourage insects to visit your garden at the same time as the bats. Buffet is open!

We had never realised that night scented plants adapted to releasing their perfume at this time of day in order to have less competition to be pollinated from other plants. Smart stuff, and obvious too. They are mostly blue, white or pale colours too as this makes them easier to be spotted in the evening light.

We learnt so much about bats the other day and now realise how much more we can do in our gardens – you all know the 3 r’s yes? Reading, writing and revolution? (Or something like that…) Well now you need to remember the 3 B’s – bees, butterflies and bats! They all want insect friendly plants, so get out there and make your garden a wildlife friendly paradise!

If you want to know more about bats then please visit the Bat Conservation Trust and become a member of BCT.

 

Apr27

Beekeepers – Quick Notes On Plants For Bees

tulips for bees

Fine news for beekeepers today – a total ban on bee-harming pesticides has been announced! To celebrate, here is a list of plants we recommend as being brilliant for the bees: Helenium Sedum Echium vulgare Marjoram or Oregano Eupatorium (common name? Joe Pye-Weed. But don’t let that put you off!) Borage Nepeta Veronicastrum Teucrium Bonus plants for shady spots? Try hellebore, lamium and pulmonaria. Looking for a shrub to plant near your apiary? Phillyrea ought to do it. Although it is difficult to get hold of…. we are working on making it more available though, so check back with Modern …

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Apr20

Thoughts On Modern Mint, April 2018

Hey Modern Minters, we have been busy already this year – so busy! Here is some of the topiary work we love doing so much…. A post shared by ModernMint (@modernmintshop) on Apr 5, 2018 at 9:48am PDT Whilst evenings (and some afternoons!) have been spent travelling the country giving garden talks to clubs, horticultural societies, WI’s and U3A’s. This is all fabulous fun but it has meant: We have not been consistent with our mailing list I have not finished the book ‘Helping The Honeybee’ I was due to get to the publisher by the end of February There …

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Mar30

Helping The Honeybee, Southend On Sea Beekeepers

Helping the honeybee

This week I gave a talk – Helping The Honeybee – to the lovely beekeeping group at Southend on Sea. Here are some notes for those who didn’t have a chance to write down some of the ideas we spoke about and shared…. The Top Plants For Bees Helenium Sedum Echium Marjoram (which you will find in your seedballs) Oregano Eupatorium, also known as Joe Pye-Weed Borage Nepeta Veronicaastrum Teucrium Phillyrea If you want a hedge for around your apiary, you will not go too far wrong with planting the amazing, tough as old boots, Phillyrea. Read plenty more about …

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