THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Oct17

7 Steps To Get Your Garden Book Published

Written a book? Think it should be published and available to search for on Garden Books at Amazon.

Want the thrill, the validation for your efforts, that getting your name on the cover of a book gives you?

This could be the blog post that helps you.

This week we took a course through the Garden Media Guild with Jackie Bennett (whose new book The Writer’s Garden: How Gardens Inspired our Best-loved Authors has just come out.) She shared with a small group of us inspiring garden writers what you need to do to get your book published.

Not everything we learnt is laid out below (it was a day filled with information) and of course, one way of doing something will not happen the same way for anyone else – but here are the major ideas to follow if you want the chance to get your book published.

1) Research your publisher

There are quite a few out there, but not everyone will want your literary gardening fantasy or your herb garden related cookbook. Be professional and find out who publishes what you are writing.

2) What genre do you fit into?

If a bookshop doesn’t know which shelf to put your book on, how will people know where they can buy it? Be clear – this is a gardening book, so you will find it here, and it will have 40,000 words and 150 photographs.

3) Who is going to buy it?

Is this for gardening newbies? Schools? Children? Know your answer authors, know your answer!

4) Who cares about your work?

Who follows you on Twitter? Who visits your blog? Where are the people who are demanding you write them a book because they are that desperate to read what you have to say? Your mum cares, we know that already. Find more people.

5) Who is the commissioning editor?

You know your publisher because you’ve done step 1. Now find out the person you are going to have to impress – and speak to them.

6) Get your synopsis right

Sell this to the commissioning editor – sell your idea so well that they are desperate to have your book on their list, and sell yourself so well they won’t want anyone else to write it. Spend so much time and energy on your synopsis because, if the book is commissioned and you are to be published, you will have done all the hard research on the book already. Steps 1-5 above are the professional writers approach to getting published. Step 6 is the art and the passion in what you do.

7) Make sure you can deliver

You will have, at most, 6 months to write this book you have spent all this time convincing people is worth it. You will not earn enough money to live on, so you need to fit it in around your life. Make sure you have the cash to visit the places you need to visit, take the photos you need to take, and can write to the standard you need to write to.

If getting the book written causes you sleepless nights, and not because you have to work a day job but because you are blocked, try the author Steven Pressfield and his book below ‘Do The Work’:

It will help.

Conclusion

What we learnt from this Garden Media Guild (and we do recommend you join them!) workshop about getting published is that the writing of the book is the easy part – you have a deadline after all, so sit down and get the work done. The hard part is getting the chance to have the strength of a publisher behind you, helping you physically make and sell your book.

And what skills do you need to get that publisher behind you?

As you are selling a synopsis to a commissioning editor who wants something easy to package and sell, it means you have to become as good at selling an idea by using a synopsis as you do at becoming a good writer.

You must also be able to fit the writing of the book into your ‘normal’ life. Because you aren’t going to earn a fortune.

Last of all, be a fantastic marketer in order to create your own market, one that runs alongside the market a publisher can place your book into. Consequently, the work you do building a following will also make you a more attractive proposition to a publisher. Why would you turn down a writer who could sell 5000 books on their own?

All of this information was gleaned from people at the Garden Media Guild, and also the Society of Authors. We thank them for all their advice and encouragement and highly recommend you join them.

If you still crave more information about getting your book published, we recommend Seth Godin and his post ‘Advice for Authors.

Good luck, and look forward to reading what you have published!

Jun28

Make Your Own Microbes

We are fans of effective microbes, and use the in our topiary work. They help keep plants healthy, meaning the plants have more tools in their toolbox and energy in their lives to stave off any diseases. Here is a lovely article that tells you how to make your own microbes. Right at the end. Make Your Own Microbes

Jun15

Boxwood – Dealing With Blight & The Caterpillar

Boxwood is one of our absolute favourite plants. The evergreen leaf that shines in winter, the smell as you clip it, the brilliant shapes you can make from it… but it is suffering somewhat from two major problems: Box Blight Boxwood Caterpillar and Moth None of this is the be all and end all for boxwood, but it helps to be aware of it and know a little about what you can do should either of these problems arise. Boxwood Caterpillar & Moth I hadn’t seen this in a garden I worked on until this spring, when a client I …

READ MORE

Jun06

Orchard Design At Brogdale, National Fruit Collection In Kent

Last weekend I visited the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, to take part in an orchard design course they were running. Beautiful place and a warm day, I recommend a visit. I came home with 3 bottles of cider. Drank them all. Then realised they were weighing in at 8%. I don’t recover that quickly (no longer being 20 years old) and so had something of a musty head the next morning. The power of apples I say! Below are some notes I made from the day. They may be of use to you, although really they are there for …

READ MORE