THE MODERN MINT BLOG

Mar28

Taj Mahal, India

Working at Modern Mint we have made it part of our mission to visit gardens and landscapes all over the world. By seeing these different places and allowing ourselves to be influenced by what we come across we believe it will make us better gardeners.

Modern Mint garden designer Darren Lerigo – ready for his Indian adventure!

Finland opened our eyes to the use of loud, bright colours during the summer months, while Japan offered us the care and thought necessary to look after a garden, and appreciate the atmospheres you can create with simple, natural elements used thoughtfully.

But last week when we visited Agra in India – well, nothing can prepare your neural pathways for immersing yourself in the colours, noise, chaos, beauty and madness of India. These first pictures from the Taj Mahal truly do make you reassess what it is possible to create in a garden, what scale you can work to and what images you can create when you have enough resources, enough time, and a burning ambition to create a masterpiece.

Taj Mahal 1

“A teardrop on the cheek of time.”

Rabindranath Tagore on the Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal is one of the major landmarks not just of India, but the world. It took 22 years and somewhere around 20,000 people to build it. This was 400 years ago. What an incredible feat of belief, to take that long to make sure you get it right. It is completely symmetrical in every way – apart from the tomb of Shah Jahan, which sits to the side of the tomb of his wife. The ornate caskets you see as you enter are false graves, built above the simple ones the bodies are actually laid in. A special ‘mud’ from Afghanistan is put on the marble every few years, allowed to dry, before being swept off. This cleans the marble the Taj Mahal is made of, which is of such good quality the mud leaves no stains.

Details of Taj Mahal
Intricate details found all over the Taj Mahal!

The gardens too are constructed on a vast scale, inhabited by squirrels and with water as a central theme, it is a pleasure to walk through them and allow yourself to get lost in the view of the Taj Mahal as the sun beats down on you, reflected back by stone floors and pathways. And it is not just the magnificent Taj Mahal to view – you have the gateway building to look at (the one you entered by) and the mosques of red sandstone that sit each side of the white marbled Taj, which balance the view and help to give purpose and majesty to the masterpiece Shah Jahan commissioned for his wife.

Taj Mahal Gardens vmm
Taj Mahal Gardens

We only got to see the Moonlight Garden from one side of the river (the side the Taj Mahal sits) but from the photo we took you can see it is laid out in line with the Taj Mahal. A magnificent idea splitting the garden across the river – it would need an Emperor to be able to do this to the landscape, rather than just ‘borrowing’ a view as we may do nowadays.

Moonlight Gardens vmm
The Moonlight Garden

We have read the lawns in the gardens at the Taj Mahal were laid by the British, probably one way of cutting labour and making them easier to manage (as well as marking ownership?) – we would love to have seen these lawns laid out with roses, fruits, flowers and trees. In fact, it reminded us a lot of the gardens Spanish designer Fernando Caruncho has made, using water and terraces, stone and shade and simple squares of pathways. These are the heavy influences of Islam and Persia, which suit gardens in hot climates.

The Taj Mahal left us stunned. We look forward to discovering how our time spent in India will affect our garden design work.

Elephant
Namaste!
Aug16

How To Use Topiary In The Garden – Talk Via Zoom

You can get a ticket for this new talk I’m giving at the European Boxwood And Topiary Society here – TALK TICKETS It is on the 25th August at 6pm. It should be great fun and I’m very excited to be sharing some recent thoughts about topiary with people – and how it might work in a modern garden.

Jun14

The Telegraph Wrote About My Topiary Work Yesterday

If you have a subscription, you can check out an article about bespoke ideas for your garden in the Telegraph. There are some great crafts people there, so check it out. Click Here To See The Article About my Topiary Work In The Telegraph

Jun06

Lockdown Thinking, Changes A-Coming…

Topiary Modern Mint

Lockdown has given me a chance to look through old notebooks and begin, gently, to piece together some sort of narrative about Modern Mint and how it has grown over the last six years. And it has changed massively in that time! Modern Mint Now, June Lockdown 2020 I currently make and maintain topiary all over the UK for clients who love well-pruned hedges and sculptures. I love this job – it is a beautiful art. In the winter I prune wisteria, roses and fruit trees in orchards. Much colder, shorter work days… but equally satisfying work. I give talks …

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